Dreamhost leader

reclaiming the legacy – afro naturism of the ancestors

Dreamhost leader

This post is part of the series reclaiming the legacy

If you are new to this site you may not know yet I am a person of African descent. I in 2016 I wrote black history series about the clothes free social reality of many of the pre-colonial people African continent. By the internationally held definition of naturism our African ancestors were likely the first naturists. They practiced a form of something I call afro-naturism. Melanated people from the African continent and many other  non-European indigenous cultures have a legacy of clothes free living.

Like many others living in the United States of America, I recently saw the Black Panther movie. The movie reminded me of several things. This included the fact that my journey to the place where I now live started in Africa. It reminded me of a connection with my African ancestors.  I suspect that is one of the reasons the movie is getting such rave reviews from people African descent. One thing that I it did not remind me of was the clothes free legacy of my ancestors. Don’t get me wrong, I loved the movie. Still reminded me that the conventional worldview of what a highly technological society looks like is “colored”,  by European view of what is civilized. The afro naturism practiced by my ancestors may well have been evident in the afro futuristic world of the Black Panther in Wakanda a without colonization. Just as historians write it was in the palace of pharaoh Akhenaten.

In the past I have written about the role that Europeans played in fetishizing and profaning the African body. In this series I want to focus on the role of people of African descent in reclaiming our ancestral legacy of afro naturism. I want to challenge people of African descent to understand that much of the socially conditioned and over sexualized approach to simple nudity in contemporary society does not honor the ancestors. Woke people understand that African heritage includes as many clothes free bodies as it does bodies covered in colorful garments with Kente patterns.

SUDAN. Kordofan. A gathering of the Nuba tribe in the Korongo Jebels (mountians). Girl dancers from the village of Kao. 1949.

Our ancestors and in fact many of our African brothers and sisters today work in society and interact efficiently wearing little or no clothing. They did and continue to do this without devolving into a sexual frenzy at the sight of a clothes free body like so many of us in the so-called “civilized” modern world. Just as becoming woke means unlearning the history we were taught in “Babylon” we need to unlearn the was we were taught to see our clothes free bodies. The reality of the African diaspora is our bodies were made into perfunctory tools useful only for labor, breeding of more labor and the sexual pleasure of slave owners.

The real legacy is much different. From the palace of Akhenaten who initiated the worship of Ra the Sun God to modern day African tribes, melanated people held the clothes free body in high esteem. It was and is seen as a vital part of our cultural heritage. When we reclaim that heritage we honor the ancestors. It may not fit “white-washed” expression of Christianity which many were taught but it is a part still is our historical legacy. One part of the mission of this web site is bringing this historical legacy to the attention of people of African descent and challenging the existing view of the naked black and brown bodies.

It is my hope that this will stimulate a conversation and motivate more African-Americans and people of African descent to reclaim that legacy towards a new afro naturist movement. I look forward to hearing your thoughts, posted in the comments section. You may explore this subject further in our decolonizing naturism group or discussion board. Visit our first naturist and afro nudism photo albums.

Examples of modern day afro naturism: Ethiopian chief – Ethiopian men body painting – soldier – Carnival participants Guinea Bissau – (the country was featured in the last Tarzan movie)

Ethiopia : Kibish,  chief of the village #1


Ethiopia : Kibish, body painting #3


Ethiopia : Kibish, Surma portrait armed and nude man #1


Carnival, Guinea Bissau by Phil Kidd


Continue reading this series:

About the author: Earl D

Founder, editor in chief, news curator clothesfreelife.com.


  1. Nakedmoluv February 20, 2018
  2. coolbrzy February 19, 2018

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