joy for the body and mind

Going naked in public is a joyful release for mind and body

I doubt I shall ever see blue in the same way again, since blue paint on my skin was the only thing covering my nakedness. I was among the 3,200 people – strangers to one another when it all began – who took part in the largest naked photo shoot in Britain, wearing nothing but four shades of blue body paint.

This work of performance art, named The Sea of Hull, was conceived by New York-based photographer Spencer Tunick and commissioned by the Ferens Art Gallery in Hull in north-east England as part of the city’s place as UK Capital of Culture in 2017, with Tunick’s exhibition as one of its highlights.

Tunick’s work has been widely discussed in academic literature as much as in the tabloids. But in the book Judging the Image by sociologist Alison Young, she describes Tunick’s early years and struggles against the law in the US, and also includes comments from those who have participated in his many installations. The spectrum of feelings aroused in those participating in Tunick’s work – as described in the book – echo the sentiments I have just heard expressed from my fellow participants in Hull.

read more – Source: The Conversation

more reflections on Tunick's sea of hull

 

 

New York-based Tunick said: “It’s always wonderful to see the various-sized people covered in paint walking through the streets of a city I admire.”

One of those who took part, Natasha Porter, has appeared in a precious Tunick project.

She told Sky News: “This was an amazing experience. It was on such a bigger scale than I’ve ever done before.

“It’s like being part of a surreal dream.”

Another participant, Hannah Savage said: “It was my first time and it was in my home city, so for me it wasn’t just a perspective of being nude and being part of an art work, it was also seeing Hull in a totally new way…

“Just this beautiful tidal wave of painted people. It was incredible.”

Read full article: Eagle Radio

The joy of the sea of Hull experience 

Going naked in public is a joyful release for mind and body

doubt I shall ever see blue in the same way again, since blue paint on my skin was the only thing covering my nakedness. I was among the 3,200 people – strangers to one another when it all began – who took part in the largest naked photo shoot in Britain, wearing nothing but four shades of blue body paint.

This work of performance art, named The Sea of Hull, was conceived by New York-based photographer Spencer Tunick and commissioned by the Ferens Art Gallery in Hull in north-east England as part of the city’s place as UK Capital of Culture in 2017, with Tunick’s exhibition as one of its highlights.
Tunick’s work has been widely discussed in academic literature as much as in the tabloids. But in the book Judging the Image by sociologist Alison Young, she describes Tunick’s early years and struggles against the law in the US, and also includes comments from those who have participated in his many installations. The spectrum of feelings aroused in those participating in Tunick’s work – as described in the book – echo the sentiments I have just heard expressed from my fellow participants in Hull.

My nude buddy summarised the event as joy, community, and release. And these are the three words with which I want to develop an approach to Tunick’s work and try to explain the reasons that led me to be a part of his human sea.

3,000 people got naked in Hull

More Than 3,000 People Got Naked and Painted Themselves Blue in England This Weekend

Tunick is known for his “ambitious” pieces featuring hordes of naked people: This particular one was to represent the rising sea levels caused by climate change, Tunick told The Guardian. “It’s the idea that the bodies and humanity is flooding the streets,” he explained. “The natural, soft vulnerable body that’s up against the concrete world – it creates a dynamic that interests me.”

The weather on Saturday in Hull was reportedly not great, but that didn’t stop anyone from participating. Tunick told the Daily Mailhe couldn’t “believe” the participants’ resolve: “It was cold, it was chilly, people had to put lotion-like paint all over their bodies – every part.”

read more – Source: Yahoo Beauty

a day with spencer Tunick in Hull

The day I got naked for Spencer Tunick

Standing naked in the centre of Hull in the small hours of the morning is not something I ever expected to be doing. But that’s where I found myself on Saturday, wearing nothing but my own skin, painted blue, alongside 3,200 other like-minded people, shivering slightly in the dawn breeze.

As soon as I heard about Spencer Tunick’s vision for his latest artwork, Sea of Hull, back in March, I registered to take part. I’m not even from Hull – I’m a recent graduate living in the countryside outside York – but I couldn’t pass up the experience of posing naked for a world famous photographer

read more – Source: The Guardian

photos from community sanctioned sea of hull on FB banned called perverted

Facebook bans Sea of Hull photos for showing ‘nudity and sexual activity’

A woman who posted a photo of Sea of Hull on Facebook has been banned from the social media site for three days.

Elly Mortimer, 46, shared selfies she took as well as photos that were circulated in the media after taking part in Spencer Tunick’s “spectacular” nude art installation.

read more – Source: Hull Daily Mall

Maybe Facebook Would Let Photographer Spencer Tunick Post Naked Pics If He Worked for Sports Illustrated

world renowned photographer runs afoul of Facebook policies

Maybe Facebook Would Let Photographer Spencer Tunick Post Naked Pics If He Worked for Sports Illustrated

Tunick was slightly uncomfortable with that plan, telling us he was ambivalent about the idea that “someone in an office in the middle of wherever – Nebraska, San Francisco – that one person decides what’s OK or not when it comes to the body in art.” But he was game to give it a try. On Valentine’s Day, Tunick sent over six photos, which Park told him he’d forwarded to the company’s “policy folks.” Four days later, Tunick got his answer.

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The Naked World of Spencer Tunick

The Naked World of Spencer Tunick

 

For 20 years now, New York-based photographer Spencer Tunick has been creating human art installations all over the world, calling together volunteers by the hundreds or thousands, asking them to remove their clothes, and photographing them in massive groups. His philosophy is that “individuals en masse, without their clothing, grouped together, metamorphose into a new shape.” He aims to create an architecture of flesh, where the masses of human bodies blend with the landscape, or juxtapose with architecture. Collected here are images from several of his installations as they were being composed. Warning: The following photos all depict naked human bodies, and are not screened out. The nudity is central to Tunick’s art. [33 photos]